Burning Fat

This is one of those posts that people reading either scream “yes” or scream “what an idiot”. Let me start off right away by stating this … if you disagree with anything I am about to talk about, or if it doesn’t jive with what you have seen or experienced, let’s take it at that and move on. Everything … and I mean everything … I talk about on this blog or on my various social outlets are an n=1 issue. If you have read me for any length of time you know of the various issues I have health wise.

I will also start by saying this … I have been having a hard time with my weight for the past year … and it has gotten to the point where I have had to take a hard look at what I have been doing vs. what I was doing when my weight was dropping in 2012-2013. After reading through my past logs and postings, and comparing them to what my current practice is, I have found some large differences, and the bottom line is that it all comes down to self-sabotage. I knew what worked in the past, and I have actively gone against what worked, for whatever idiotic reasoning has been in my head. It is time to halt this train and get my head straight again, and this posting is part of that, so bear with me as I share what I have found works and doesn’t work, for me.

The Best Cardio for Losing Fat

Here it is in a nutshell. If you are training for a long course event, say a marathon or triathlon, you are not going to lose weight. These events and burning fat do not go together. Long form cardio is not effective as a foundation for a weight loss program. Many people and sources have told me this over the past 4 years, from Vinnie Tortorich personally, to books by various other people, but I have fought this concept. I have fought it at my own risk. When my training went from sprint triathlons and half marathon’s to marathons and 70.3 triathlons I started gaining weight again. Not only did I start gaining weight, I also started getting injured, and the heavier I got the more apt I was to getting hurt at some point. A vicious circle.

So what is?

The exact opposite.

The first two years all I was doing was sprint and olympic triathlons, and my weight was dropping. My weight was dropping because my training program consisted of 20 mile bike rides vs. 40-50 mile rides. It consisted of swim workout of 100 meter splits to “long sets” of 400 meters. Runs were 3 miles, not 6-10 miles.

And you know what else I was doing? I was lifting weights. But more on that in a little bit.

So when doing shorter, higher intensity, work I went from 303 pounds down to 235 pounds. Then I started adding distance events, marathons, 70.3’s, even attempting to train for a 140.6, and my weight is now 271 pounds. The most frustrating thing? I KNOW better. This year we paired it back to sprint only triathlon’s but we also had a century ride on the docket, so on the weekends for 18 weeks we were in the hills preparing for North Carolina … 30 miles rides, 45 mile rides, 60 mile rides …. and the weight kept going up and up and up.

This is not going to happen any longer.

So, What Should I DO to Lose Weight?

So if long course training should not be the foundation, what should be?

The exact opposite. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). This means short burst of energy with short breaks in between.

This means an hour bike ride that is broken up into bursts of 10 minute, out of the seat, sprinting followed by a 1 minute spin, and then hitting it again. This means 1:00 running as hard as you can followed by a 30 second walk, and then going again. It means sets of 100 meter pool sprints with a 20-30 second rest in between, while maintain race pace as best you can throughout each set.

It also means WEIGHT training.

When I was going to Powerhouse with a co-worker at lunch a couple of years ago, my weight was dropping fast. AND I was getting stronger very quickly. When my psoriatic arthritis flared up for the first time I stopped going, and my weight has been going up ever since. I am starting to think that the foundation of a weight loss program should be strength training, even before HIIT. But it has to be done correctly.

I have a history of lifting. I started in my days playing football and as a member of the weight lifting team, but continued well into my naval service s a way to escape the monotony of being at sea for 6-7 months at a time, and the funny thing is, the lessons taught to me back then are proving to still be the most effective.

Muscle hypertrophy is when the metabolic effect happens, and subsequently weight loss occurs, so the idea is to get into that state and stay there. Hypertrophy happens when the muscle is under tension, so “time under tension” (TUT) is the key. What this normally means, for most people, is the following:

  • 0 – 20 seconds – strength is being built
  • 20 – 40 seconds – strength is being built with the beginning of muscle hypertrophy
  • 40 – 70+ seconds – no strength is being built and the muscle hypertrophy is constant

So, if you load up a bar with 200 pounds and bench press it three times, you are building strength and strength only. If you load the same bar with 100 pounds and bench it to failure, say 30 times, you are into hypertrophy and are starting to burn fat. It’s the old “High Weight Low Rep” to get strong method. Still seems to work.

The additional point is TIBS, or “time in-between sets”. Most people in gyms take forever in-between a set. They lift the weight for 30 seconds, then talk, or text, for 4 minutes before doing the next set. This accomplishes nothing. In order to “keep the burn” on your TIBS should be under 45 seconds.

OK, So I Need to Lift Weights … What Weights??

This is easy …

When you walk into a gym and see all the fancy equipment lining the walls … ignore  them … and head straight back to the free weights.

I know that is scary, because that’s where the monsters live, but trust me … you only need 5 exercises to gain strength and lose weight.

  1. Bench Press
  2. Dead Lift
  3. Squat
  4. Barbell Row
  5. Overhead Press

Yes, there are machines where you can do these exercises, and in a pinch they will work, but a free weights not only give you the weight to lift, they also cause yo to balance the weight, which makes it a better exercise all around. Machines take the “feel” from you.

When I was going to Powerhouse with Dave with split these 5 exercises into two workout. They were:

  • Workout A: Squat, Bench Press, Barbell Row
  • Workout B: Squat, Overhead Press, Dead Lift

The key, as is true with most thing, is FORM. Make sure you have the form down before adding more and more weight to the bars (and one more reason to use free weights over machines). This might mean lifting only the bar itself, but in the long run it will save you from injury. If you feel unsure about asking for help, YouTube has plenty of video’s showing form and function. Kelly Slater is a valuable tool on there.

So .. That’s ALL There Is?

Of course not. As I stated in the beginning, everyone is different, so feel free to play with this a bit. The core is sound, however. Long Course Training should not be your base for losing weight. You will end up frustrated and injured. I know this for a fact, even if I don’t practice what I preach.

You also MUST watch what you eat. Just like a computer, if you put crap in you will get crap results. Eat no processed food, including sugar and grains (I know I will get comments on that one). Naturally occurring sugar, like in fruits and vegetables, are fine, but cut out the artificial sweeteners, the Dixie Crystals, etc. If you need carbs, then fine, but it doesn’t mean eating pasta, unless you can lead me to a pasta tree.

I hope this helps some of you.

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